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Kick-off Meeting: 29/30 June 2016

Doktoratskolleg

-PhD program- 


Microbial Nitrogen Cycling – From Single Cells to Ecosystems
 
 
University of Vienna, Faculty of Life Sciences

 

 

Kickoff meeting 29/30 June 2016

      

  

Location: KLI Klosterneuburg, Martinstraße 12, A-3400, Klosterneuburg

Participants: DK+ Faculty and associates, DK+ students and associated DK+ students, invited speakers, interested guests

Lectures on the first day will be open for guests from other universities, research centers and schools

 

Program Day 1 - June 29

13:00

Lunch

14:00 - 14:30

Johannes Jäger

Scientific director of KLI

Welcome to KLI

 

Christa Schleper

Department of Ecogenomics and Systems Biology, University of Vienna

Speaker of PhD program

Presentation of the DK+ structure and goals

14:30 - 14:40      

Melina Kerou

Scientific Coordinator of the PhD program

Hiring procedure and statistics

14:40 - 15:40

open lecture

Lisa Stein

Professor of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Canada

“NO way to Nitrous Oxide Production by Ammonia-Oxidizers”

15:40 - 16:10coffee break

16:10 - 17:10

open lecture

Jan Willem Erisman

Professor of Integrated Nitrogen Studies, VU University of Amsterdam, CEO of Louis Bolk Institute

"Nitrogen: too much of a vital resource"

17:10 - 18:45Poster session of the DK students with wine and cheese / tour of the KLI
19:00Dinner at Heurigen

 

Program Day 2 - June 30

 

 

9:00 - 10:15        

DK plus Faculty:

Dagmar Woebken

Division of Microbial Ecology


Andreas Richter

Division of Terrestrial Ecosystem Research


Stefanie Wienkoop

Division of Molecular Systems Biology


Holger Daims

Division of Microbial Ecology


15 min talks, introducing N-cycle research at the University of Vienna by faculty of the PhD programme

10:15 - 10:45coffee break
10:45 - 11:15

Wilfried Winiwarter

European Director of the International Nitrogen Initiative

Senior Research Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Laxenburg, Austria

"The International Nitrogen Initiative - policy relevant research on environmental impacts of nitrogen compounds"

11:15 - 12:15

DK plus Faculty:

Thomas Rattei

Division of Computational Systems Biology


Gerhard Herndl

Division of Marine Biology


Christa Schleper

Division of Archaea Biology and Ecogenomics


Michael Wagner

Division of Microbial Ecology


15 min talks, introducing N-cycle research at the University of Vienna by faculty of the PhD programme

12:15 - 13:15

Lunch

End of Meeting

13:15 - 14:30DK plus round table (students only)

 

 

Speakers

Lisa Stein

Professor of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Canada

“NO way to Nitrous Oxide Production by Ammonia-Oxidizers”

Nitrous oxide is a critical greenhouse gas that continues to increase in the atmosphere, yet the microbial pathways and processes that control its production are still largely uncharacterized. Aside from heterotrophic denitrifiers, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and Thaumarchaea are implicated as major producers of N2O. Our comparative studies of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and Thaumarchaea revealed several interesting insights to N2O production including essential and non-essential enzymology, metabolic intermediates, and interactions between biotic and abiotic processes. This work places NO as a key molecule that ammonia-oxidizers produce and use in a surprising variety of physiological contexts to ultimately produce N2O.

 

Jan Erisman

Professor of Integrated Nitrogen Studies, VU University of Amsterdam, CEO of Louis Bolk Institute

“Nitrogen: too much of a vital resource”

Human modification of the nitrogen cycle is one of the central global ignored challenges affecting human health, ecosystem integrity and biodiversity. The planetary boundary for nitrogen has been breached by a factor two, making nitrogen one of the most urgent pressures on the earth system. Excess nitrogen originating from chemical fertilizers, animal manure and burning of fossil fuels, are increasingly affecting soil, water and air quality. However, nitrogen also plays an important role in food security. The human creation of chemical nitrogen fertilizer has enabled the production of more food and a change to more protein rich diets. It has been estimated that without chemical nitrogen fertilizer, only half of the people would have enough food given current diets and agricultural practices. I will present an overview of the nitrogen challenge and also explores options to decrease the negative impacts of excess nitrogen on biodiversity and ecosystems, while at the same time providing food security to  a growing world population.

 

University of Vienna's Medienportal announcement for the meeting: Den Mikroorganismen auf der Spur

 

 

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